Pages Navigation Menu

Stop Shoulding on Your Children by Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller

It’s usually possible to make a strong case that your child should have done something—or done something different—in a particular situation. So what? There is no point in laying blame for what “should have” been done but wasn’t. The useful question is not whether the “right” thing was done, but what action is appropriate given the current situation. A “should have” statement is a phrase designed to dispense guilt. It is an effort to attach shame and fix blame. “Should have” statements draw your children’s attention away from problem solving and produce feelings that are counterproductive to searching for solutions to the problem at hand. “You should have listened to me.” “You should have minded your own business.” “You should have known better.” “You should have called him right away.” “You should have told me sooner.” “You should have...

Read More

Emotional Intelligence – a Key to Your Child’s Future Health & Happiness by Sandie Sedgbeer

As conscientious and caring parents, we invest a lot of time and money in helping our children develop the skills they need to succeed in life. We send them to the best schools, save for college, sign them up for soccer and piano lessons, and teach them the value of hard work.   At the end of it all, we envision ourselves gazing proudly at a shelf full of trophies and a framed diploma feeling satisfied that our hard work has paid off. But will our children really be as well prepared for life as we think they will be? When they get frustrated because someone else is scoring all the goals, what do they do with those feelings? When they get their first job and encounter an unreasonable supervisor, how will they respond? Do they have the necessary empathy...

Read More

Can I Have a Little R.E.S.P.E.C.T. Please? By Brenna Smith

As humans, we are hard wired for connectedness and have a natural instinct to want to experience both being respected and also being respectful. It’s a dynamic flow- a certain way of being that allows us to be heard and seen within our respective circles of life be it relationship, work, family, and community. Respect is a part of a broader thread of family virtues such as responsibility, kindness, love, peacefulness, courtesy and generosity that is woven into the fabric of our environment. These kinds of qualities are what generate a certain level of cohesiveness in our respective homes. I want to single out respect for purposes of this discussion because respect often carries some baggage. It can be a tricky word and when people are not feeling it, we tend to spiral into patterns of behavior that don’t...

Read More

Sleep and the ASD Child By Bill Nason

Bill Nason is Moderator of the excellent  “Autism Discussion Page” on Facebook. Excerpted from The Autism Discussion Page on the Core Challenges of Autism: A toolbox for helping children with autism feel safe, accepted, and competent Difficulty sleeping is a very common problem with children on the spectrum. As many as 50% of children on the spectrum experience some difficulty sleeping. This can be a real problem for both the child and parents getting their needed rest. For the children, who already have fragile nervous systems, lack of sleep will compound any other difficulties (sensory, emotional, behavioral, etc.) they are experiencing. Steady sleep patterns are essential to keep the nervous system calm and organized. Listed below are several of the common strategies used to stabilize sleep patterns. Consistent bedtime routine: The body needs to calm down and relax in...

Read More

Bullying: A Different Perspective & How We Can Be a Part of the Solution  by Tisha Marina Bernard

 Somebody asked me the other day, “What is wrong with kids these days?” They had seen on the news a story about some kids relentlessly bullying another kid on the school bus. As an educator, I get asked this question a lot. I work with an organization called Safe School Ambassadors as a Bully Prevention Specialist and travel the nation teaching bully prevention to elementary, middle and high schools. I have seen it all. From verbal mistreatment to physical mistreatment. From suicide to homicide. When we imagine our students going to school everyday, it is important to know most of them are walking into a battlefield. It is plaguing students across the country on daily basis. In fact, bullying is now a national epidemic.    The most common current definition of bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-aged children that involves...

Read More

Are Your Children Being Deprived? Take the Test by Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller

Some parents give their children designer clothes, foreign trips and a personal TV. Others give them attention and experiences and hold them accountable for their actions. What do your children get? Are you unknowingly depriving your children of important lessons and learnings? Find out here by taking the Deprived Child Test. See how you score. Which of the following items do you give your children? Rate yourself for each on a scale of 0-3. 0= never 1= rarely 2= once in a while 3= regularly Do you give your children . . .? Regular trips to the library. Buying your children 100 books does not count. Do you take your children to the library and allow them to select books of their own interest and let them be responsible for returning them on time? Creating a spot in your...

Read More

The Do’s and Don’ts of Dealing with Lying By Chick Moorman and Thomas Haller

Jason Roberts listened to his son’s explanation of the missing cookies and then called him a liar. Brenda Taylor thought her three-year-old’s lies were cute, so she ignored them. Yee Chen told her daughter that if she told the truth this time, she would let it go. While all of these parents love their children and want them to develop truth telling as a virtue, each violated one of the eighteen do’s and don’ts of dealing with lying. Read on to find out how. 1. Do understand that all children lie. Dogs bark. Cats meow. And children lie. Your neighbors’ children lie. Your sister’s children lie. And, yes, your own children lie. 2. Don’t confuse exaggeration with lying. Young children often exaggerate. Embellished stories are more a sign of a creative imagination than of a person who doesn’t tell...

Read More